Already Prettypoll: Dominant Season vs. Season of Choice

The past two extensive vacations that HM and I have taken have been to Iceland and Britain. Apparently we’ll take cold and rain over warm beaches and poolside seats any day. We are northerners through and through, and although the winters here in Minnesota can be long, dark, and brutal, I’ll happily take them over endless humid summer days. I love layering, scarves, bundling up, and feeling covered. I am lucky enough to live in a place where the dominant season (winter) is my season of choice.

My friend Lorry is a native Californian who moved to Maine several years ago. I wasn’t sure she’d survive a New England winter, but she’s managed to pull through. However, I wouldn’t venture to say that her dominant season (fall/winter) is her season of choice (whatever the eternal fall-ish weather of Northern California might be called). Pretty sure she’d rather spend her Decembers in peacoats and leather boots than down parkas and Sorels.

How about you? When it comes to dressing, what is your season of choice? Is it the same as the dominant season in your place of residence? 

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20 Responses to “Already Prettypoll: Dominant Season vs. Season of Choice”

  1. vlg

    Hmm…. last year I happily picked out not one, not two, but FOUR pairs of Columbia snow boots! I’m always a little sad when I can no longer wear my sweaters and wool cardigans. And it’s a wee bit disappointing that hot weather limits layering, so yep, I guess my sartorial preference aligns with my geographic area (New England).

  2. Suzanne Carillo

    Our winters are far too long and I hate layering on 2 coats, boots, scarves, hats, gloves. These last few winters have been especially long in Toronto.

    When we lived on Vancouver Island I did quite well with the moderate climate.

    bisous
    Suzanne

  3. KryptoBunny

    I’m mildly obsessed with seasonality — styles and color palettes especially, not that I can actually replicate the kinds of things that fill my pinterest boards. So I like all seasons, at least conceptually, but since my wardrobe says “stop buying boots and sweaters!” I must be especially attracted to fall. It makes sense, because I’m originally from Pennsylvania, where we have real three-month autumns. Now that I live in Minnesota, where winter seems to last roughly half of the year sometimes, I’ve come to rather dislike winter, in some ways — I’m very sorry the first day I pull out the huge puffy coat I’m forced to wear because I use so much public transportation. But at least it’s better than awful, sweaty summer! Plus it’s given me the extremely enjoyable experience of visiting home in winter (well, “winter” — in Southern PA it rarely dips below 20) and running around with no coat on, gushing about how warm it is while everyone else complains!

  4. lindaloui232

    I live in Denver, so I suppose I’m a bit spoiled weather-wise. We get all 4 seasons, but nothing horribly extreme, and no season is overly long. Winter can be mostly in the 40’s and sunny, with maybe 2 weeks of single digits. Snow melts pretty quickly because we get lots of sunshine year round. Summer is 80’s and 90’s, but hardly any humidity. Fall is usually gorgeous, spring a bit unpredictable – maybe rain, maybe snow, maybe 75 degrees. So I basically have a warm weather/cold weather wardrobe and switch it out in May and October. I like wearing leather, sweaters, boots, skirts and dresses with tights as much as I like wearing shorts, tees, sandals, skirts and dresses with bare legs. So I guess I’m in the right place.

  5. Sam M

    I live in upstate New York, and we pretty much get the full range of temperatures. Winter can dip -20F (it did last winter…that was hellish) and summer can get into the 100s. It’s interesting because I totally love being covered up and bundled as well. My coat and jacket collection are definitely testaments to that! But I also love being tan and feeling warm in the sunshine, so it’s a toss up. That being said, I definitely have more fall/winter clothing than spring/summer clothing. What can I say? I love a good sweater or pair of boots.
    Sam Manzella

  6. K Magill

    I’m a northern New Englander currently living in the HOT southwest. It’s been quite a trip trying to adapt my wardrobe and fashion sensibilities! I can wear flats and sandals year ’round here, no need for boots at all. I rarely need more than a hoodie for layering, and for at least 4 months of the year (if not 6!) I basically live in sundresses, tank tops, etc. It’s odd to me to have so much skin exposed all the time (I have tattoos and I’ve had to get used to a lot more comments on them here than back home, where they were often covered up). I definitely miss layering–and I love jeans, cords, wool, and flannel, none of which is appropriate for my current climate. A lot of my favourite clothes only get worn once or twice a year here. I definitely look forward to moving back to a place with all four seasons!

    • Monica H

      How long have you lived here? I moved to Phoenix 20 years ago and thought people were insane for wearing boots, cords, wool and the like. After a few years here, I figured out why. You do get used to it after a few years! The summer heat remains oppressive, but soon you too will be wearing winter clothes when it’s 60 degrees out like everyone else. : )

      • K Magill

        I’ve only been here 2 years–and I’ve been pregnant/postpartum/breastfeeding the whole time, which hasn’t helped my wardrobe or my ability to regulate body temperature! I’m finally getting the hang of wearing jeans on 90+ degree days, and keeping a lightweight linen jacket with me all the time to help transition into and out of AC environments. I totally understand still wanting to rock the fall/winter look whenever possible, it’s my favorite season, but when I don too many layers here it feels like a costume!

  7. Kate McIvor

    I’m a winter living in Montana — Perfect match!

  8. Ann ///M

    My season of choice is summer. When I lived in Minnesota, I was so sick of winter clothes by the time spring finally rolled around. I don’t enjoy layering and keeping track of so many different garments. I hate wearing tights, so it was pants everyday, and I felt like my wardrobe was more limited.

    I moved from Minneapolis to Atlanta last year, and am so much happier with the weather here! Getting dressed is so much more fun. My style has gotten more minimal in heat – no layers, fewer accessories. I have visible tattoos, which are much less common here than they were in Minneapolis, and they have become my accessories.

    We get just a little “winter” here, and by winter I mean days in the 40s and 50s, which are perfect for pulling out boots and leather jackets. After about three months of cooler temps this winter, I was ready to break out the sandals again when it got back to the 70s in March!

  9. Beth Maxey

    With the exception of parts of San Francisco and perhaps the far northern coastal or eastern mountain regions, northern CA is anything but ‘eternal fallish’ weather. I live in the ‘real’ northern CA — some 200 miles north of SF — and we have very hot, dry summers, mild winters, and beautiful springs. Fall doesn’t really arrive until sometime in October, if we’re lucky that year….I’ve seen it hit 110 in October. Yesterday we were 108 here. It is not uncommon to see 112-115 in the hottest months, mostly with humidity below 10%. While I like the cool, wet winters (not in the last three years, however, since we’ve been in a drought), the summers make me hole up in the AC. I was born in MN but don’t like the extreme cold and snow of the upper Midwest. The SF peninsula has a wonderful climate — but it is way too expensive — and there are those pesky earthquakes too. We’re looking at moving to the Olympic Peninsula in Washington — another lovely marine climate.

  10. natalie rumore

    I was born and raised and still reside in Los Angeles and I abhor the heat. It’s not uncommon for temperatures to remain in the 100s all summer long. And the heat usually lasts well into “fall” and “winter”. I remember countless Christmas mornings where the sun was shining and it was in the 70s and I absolutely hated it – I’ve always wanted a White Christmas.
    I’ve always maintained that I would rather be cold than hot because it seems like it would be easier to get warmer than get cooler. But then again, I’ve never lived (or even really experienced…) true cold weather. I have numerous pairs of boots and lots of sweaters and coats that I can wear maybe a few times a year….and I definitely prefer that type of clothing. I know a lot of people envy the weather here and say we’re spoiled, but I hate the unpredictability and discomfort of it. I want to move to NYC in a few years – maybe then I’ll truly experience all seasons and be able to have a more well-defined opinion!

  11. Deborah O'Keefe

    Fall ! And just the early part of our Minnesota winters. I feel more comfortable in layers rather than showing some skin. I like the tactile sensation of soft fuzzy sweaters and I prefer the colors of fall and winter clothing. However, I don’t like it when I’ve got a great summer outfit going on but I have to wear a sweater at work because the AC is cranked up in here!

  12. Monica H

    I think I’m pretty well suited for where I live – Phoenix AZ. I joke that we do have four seasons here: 1) Summer, 2) Spring/Fall, 3) Summer, and 4) Hell. Since I work in an office that is usually freezing, I usually wear clothes that would be considered ‘seasonless’ and adaptable. A dress with a sweater, medium weight skirt with a light top and a jacket. One thing that is SUPER annoying is having to have some sort of layering at almost all times, due to the extremes of 110 outside and 72 inside! I’m cold-blooded enough that I still have boots, wool sweaters, and even a down jacket that I wear during colder months, but I’m usually happy enough to put them away once warmer temps roll around. If I had to wear pants or tights for most of the year (to say nothing of coping with lack of sunlight) I’d be quite unhappy.

  13. crtfly

    I live in the far northern coastal area of CA. I guess we’re in the eternal fallish weather you refer to. But drive just a few miles inland and you get the weather Beth describes. I know what city she is probably talking about. It’s way too hot for me over there. I’ll take my coastal fog and temps rarely above the low 70s. 75 is a hot day for us. Clothing in fall colors are my favorites. Also, as I have mentioned to you before, I have a serious sweater habit. It’s almost impossible for me not to buy during a sweater sale. I am in exactly the right location to wear my favorite kind of clothes. I am happiest in the fall and Halloween is my favorite holiday.

    Chris

  14. polkadotsandcurry

    Im from CO and I get to enjoy all seasons. I love CO summers, and I prefer summer fashion. But I also enjoy winter fashion- boots, scarves, coats, layers, really wish if winters were not that harsh as they have been for last couple of years !!

  15. Ruth Slavid

    I live in London and although I know we are spoiled by a temperate climate, I do yearn for ‘skirt weather’. We haven’t had a cold winter for a couple of years – ie not below freezing, but we never have as much summer as we hope. This year so far it has rarely topped around 18C which is OK if it is sunny but not if it is windy and/ or wet. yesterday I don’t think it passed about 11C. Skirt weather for me is either winter with tights and boots or summer with bare legs and sandals. We seem to have had weeks when you don’t need to wear winter clothes but can’t quite get into summer ones either. Too much spring and autumn here. By the way, I am shocked by the cold that you have Sally but was then surprised when you posted photos from London to see how bundled up you were in our summer as if you treated that as cold!

  16. contrary kiwi

    I literally moved country to change climate. I used to live in Christchurch, NZ, where the entire year it barely gets above the mid-70s even in summer and tends to live around the 35-45 mark in winter. That might be acceptable or even desirable for other people but for me that is misery.

    I now live in Brisbane, Australia. It rarely dips below 50 in winter and is, in fact, at 9pm right now 10 days into winter, 68 degrees outside. I’m a little chilly, but I am wearing a t-shirt. In summer it’s usually about 85 degrees but can get up to 107.

    I actually like having four distinct seasons, but my average temperature in those seasons has to be much higher for me than for many others. 60 degrees is a good “brr, I’m freezing, gotta wear 10 million layers” temp for me and 84 is about when I go “whew, it’s warm, let’s have an ice block”.

    In terms of style, I like being able to layer, wear simple jeans and t-shirts mixes and wear as little as propriety permits, so I think Brisbane is a good fit for me. I don’t wear sandals because I have yet to find some that don’t hurt my feet, so I’m a boots and Chuck Taylors person all year round, but I love being able to sometimes wear shorts and a tank top and sometimes wear a singlet, merino top, jeans and a leather jacket. In NZ I had to layer CONSTANTLY (my best friend for years thought I loved layering). I’m much happier now.

  17. Elizabeth

    I’m with you Sally in that I am not a fan of humid summer days! YUCK! BUT I don’t know how you survive MN winters or how you friend survives in Maine.

    I live in Brooklyn, New York and while we pretty much get it all weather wise I spent the great chunk of this past winter saying: “Thank God I don’t live in New England . . . ” I COULD NOT have handled all of that snow. The New York winter was bad enough.

    I’ve always preferred the fall weather and clothing wise.

  18. Emmy

    I feel very lucky to be living in southeast Asia, where the heat and complete absence of winter suit me very well. Even the humidity works for me, as my skin is really dry year-round. Also, getting dressed is easy in a hot climate. I’ve never been able to master the art of layering, so I love being able to just throw on a dress, or jeans and a top, add a scarf, and then run out the door.