Posts Categorized: style

Reader Request: Internal Style Conflicts

What do you do when your dressing preferences clash with expert recommendations for flattering your figure?

Reader Sarah e-mailed this request to me:

I’m short and small-boned and hourglass-shaped, and I can find lots of advice for dressing that body type (full skirts, v-necks, nipped waists, tailored pants, etc.). However, I feel like there’s a clash between my body type and other elements: my face (apple-cheeked, not conventionally pretty), my hair (very short), and my personality (tomboyish, casual). When I wear skirts and dresses, which I do think suit my body, I feel very self-conscious, like I don’t match what I’m wearing. Clothes that I feel more like myself in (bootcut jeans, casual graphic tees) do not make me look my best. I wonder if other women struggle with this type of conflict, and how they deal with it. read more

Originally posted 2013-07-31 06:05:30.

Clothing Moves

Your clothing and accessories will shift around throughout the day unless you hold perfectly still. This happens to everyone, and is totally normal!

Two of the most common questions I get on my outfit posts are as follows:

  1. There are no belt loops on that skirt. How do you keep your belt in place?
  2. How do you keep your scarf from shifting around?

Answer to both: I don’t. I don’t keep my belt in place and I don’t keep my scarf from shifting around. Because barring use of staples and glue,* I really can’t. I feel like these questions represent some of the myths that have been unintentionally perpetuated by style blogs: That some women hold the secret to a perfectly styled and utterly immobile scarf. That some body types can keep a belt in place without loops. It’s just not true, friends. In these photos I am standing relatively still after having adjusted my outfit to look as I wish it to. And even then I sometimes have to fuss with my belt or scarf after a photo or two! Clothing and accessories move around. Unless you work as a Live Mannequin, yours will shift, too. And there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that. read more

Originally posted 2013-07-29 06:21:20.

Reader Request: Flattering a Large Ribcage

Tips for dressing to flatter a large ribcage

Reader L e-mailed me this question:

I know this might be a question that applies to a lot of people, but in case it’s useful info, my specific body is like this: I’m about 5’7″, and I weigh somewhere between 145 and 150 lbs at any given minute. I have a very short waist (less than 2.5″ between my last rib and my hipbones), very small breasts (a-b cup, I rarely wear underwire bras) and a large ribcage–about 37 inches around. It’s not that I’m barrel-chested, which I know is an actual medical diagnosis, just that I’m really wide side-to-side. I’ve always struggled with those apple/pear/rectangle body classifications. I have the wide top half and super long legs that would make me an apple, except that I’ve never particularly had a tummy and my waist does come in a couple inches between my ribs and my hips (but it’s short enough to not particularly produce an hourglass shape). And while I have curvy hips and a big butt that mean I’m not really rectangular at all, my torso’s much shorter and wider than those shapes called pear. read more

Originally posted 2013-06-18 06:39:20.