Posts Tagged: donation

Consignment vs. Thrift: Knowing Your Options

What are the differences between consignment and thrift store shopping?

When it comes to my outfit posts, I tend to list anything that’s been bought secondhand as “thrifted,” which isn’t quite fair. Yes, items purchased at consignment shops are used and yes, I had to do some digging to find them. But thrift stores and consignment stores are really quite different.

HOW THRIFT STORES WORK

Weeellll, some will work differently than others. But here in the U.S., the vast majority of thrift shops are donation-based and center on a charity or non-profit organization. Community members donate used goods – including clothing, shoes, and accessories – to the organization in question. Although donating truly ruined items is discouraged, damaged, heavily worn, and flawed items are relatively common. Items are sorted and priced by volunteers, then sent to the sales floor where they are bought by shoppers. read more

Originally posted 2013-08-19 06:08:04.

When to Thrift

when to thrift

Wait. Isn’t ANYTIME a good time to thrift? Well, yes, especially in this world of fast-fashion and consumer waste. But there are a few timing-related factors to consider.

Toward the beginning of the season

Even if you’re a bargain-hunter extraordinaire who waits until garments have been marked down at least three times before pouncing, consider thrifting at the beginning of the season instead of the end. Thrift store items are so much cheaper than retail, even at “full price,” and if you thrift when the season is just beginning you’ll get first pick of new offerings. Waiting for markdowns will mean better bargains, but as the season begins to peter out, so do the seasonally appropriate offerings. Get shopping while the getting’s good. read more

Originally posted 2013-04-23 06:47:07.

An Argument for Consignment Stores

Consignment-Store-480x360

One of the most eye-opening and alarming facts I learned from watching “The True Cost” was about thrift stores. I already knew that some of the clothing that gets donated ends up somewhere other than on the racks, but I had no idea how much. Do you? Well, around 80% of donated clothing ends up going to textile recyclers because thrift stores receive FAR more clothing than they could ever house and sell. And although 55% of that 80% is recycled into industrial materials like insulation and pillow stuffing, 45% is exported to developing countries. The film pointed out that when this influx of clothing arrives – relatively new, sometimes trendy, and definitely affordable – it can cause local clothing makers to lose business. Or be driven out of business entirely. And the sheer amount that shows up is more than most communities can handle, so much of it ends up in landfills. read more