Posts Tagged: length

Reader Request: The Pant Hem Dilemma

How to determine the perfect pant hem length for YOUR needs!

Image courtesy Banana Republic

Reader Kerry e-mailed me this question:

Whenever I buy new dress pants for work, I have to have the length altered. Each time, they languish in my bedroom while I try to determine which shoes I should wear to the tailor: should I wear the heels, the flats, the in-between shoes? If I have my pants shortened so I can wear flats with them, they will look silly with the heels and vice versa. But I don’t want to have a pair of pants for heels and a pair for flats, because a decent pair of pants is expense (plus tailoring) and I don’t want to have to buy “heels pants” and “flats pants.” read more

Originally posted 2013-01-22 06:44:45.

Reader Request: Guidelines for Tucking

when should i tuck my shirt

Reader Elizabeth sent me this question via e-mail:

… lots of curvier women tuck in their tops, which feels totally daring and, frankly, scary to me, but they look fantastic. While I know it can be frumpy, I usually leave tails out in an effort to get some flowyness (is that a word?) going and gloss over my belly. Could you talk about the way tucking in tops or leaving them out affects proportion, and what it helps to emphasize (or not)?

When it comes to tucking, I believe the three main factors are proportion, desired aesthetic, and comfort. read more

Originally posted 2012-09-21 06:05:21.

What We Can Learn from Dressing

As a person who loves and explores style, I understand my body now in ways I never did before. I don't fear it, I don't avoid it, and I feel like I can converse with it through dressing and clothing. And I'm much happier now that we're on speaking terms again.

Before I became interested in dressing and style, I avoided thinking about my body. At all costs. I didn’t look in the mirror if I didn’t have to, didn’t focus much energy or attention on how my outfits interacted with my figure, and did my utmost to think about anything besides my own physicality. Because of this choice, the information I was given about my body came almost exclusively from external sources. And none of it was good news: I was chubby, disproportionate, my breasts were too small and my hips were too big, my arms were flabby and so was my stomach. Virtually all of this information was comparative: I was flabby compared to Gwyneth Paltrow, my breasts were too small compared to Victoria’s Secret models … you know the drill. I studiously ignored my body, hoping its perceived inadequacies would diminish if I pretended I was a brain in a jar. And yet this comparative information still crept in and made me feel inadequate. read more

Originally posted 2013-09-16 06:02:50.