Posts Tagged: magazines

How to Find Inspiration Everywhere

This is a photo of Vanessa from the (now defunct) blog Big Girl, Small Budget, Tiny Town. She is wearing a kick-ass outfit with some bold colors and fun proportions. Vanessa and I have different shapes, sizes, budgets, proportions, and shopping resources, but when I look at this photo of her, it inspires me. It makes me want to wear yellow and orange with a pink-printed scarf. It makes me want to try a tunic over a midi. It makes me want to do a short layer over two longer layers. And yes, it makes me want to visit the Badlands, but that’s not the point! The point is that, despite all of our differences, this image of Vanessa’s sparked my imagination and prompted me to think of ways I can interpret her look for myself. read more

Originally posted 2011-12-09 06:35:50.

Guest Post: Autumn Whitefield-Madrano, Author of Face Value

I am not exaggerating when I say that Autumn Whitefield-Madrano is one of my all-time favorite people in the universe. We’ve hung out a grand total of three times in about five years of knowing each other, but we’re pretty well convinced we were sisters in a past life. Or really, really chummy cousins. She is INCREDIBLY smart and insightful, and examines some of the most complex issues surrounding modern womanhood with skill and delicacy, while also being brutally honest about her own confusion and frustration with unknowns. So, naturally, I was over the moon when I heard she’d secured a book deal. read more

Diversity, Normalcy, and the Real World

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Back in October, “Selma” director Ava DuVernay’s spoke at Elle’s Women in Hollywood awards. She spoke about diversity, but she framed her thoughts in an unusual way: She pointed out that what the media dubs “diversity” is really just “normalization.” She said:

Last thing I’ll say is I really hate the word ‘diversity.’ Oh, I just don’t like it. It feels like medicine. Diversity is like, ‘Ugh. I have to do diversity.’ I recognize and celebrate what it is, but that word, to me, is a disconnect. There’s an emotional disconnect. Inclusion feels closer; belonging is even closer. Because we all belong to film. We all belong to television. We all belong to what this is. We look at Shondas and the Jills and the Oprahs and the Kathryns and all the women doing work behind the camera … So, I just want us to think about belonging. Think about who belongs. And welcoming people into that belonging. read more