Posts Tagged: media

I Love My Knees

knees

Can we talk about knees for a moment?

Many years ago, a friend made a passing comment about her “fat knees.” I was about 22 at the time and utterly baffled. Previous to that, I’d never met anyone who felt self-conscious about her knees for any reason and figured they were not a point of bodily scrutiny for most folks. Oh, how wrong I was. And the older I get, the more women I meet who are so ashamed of their knees that they insist upon covering them with long pants or midi skirts at all times. And although most of these women are older than me – apparently knees that have passed the age of 40 are frequently assigned to the “eye-searingly gross” category – some are younger. Many, many women hate their knees. Women of all ages, sizes, and shapes. read more

Originally posted 2014-10-20 06:15:51.

Guest Post: Autumn Whitefield-Madrano, Author of Face Value

I am not exaggerating when I say that Autumn Whitefield-Madrano is one of my all-time favorite people in the universe. We’ve hung out a grand total of three times in about five years of knowing each other, but we’re pretty well convinced we were sisters in a past life. Or really, really chummy cousins. She is INCREDIBLY smart and insightful, and examines some of the most complex issues surrounding modern womanhood with skill and delicacy, while also being brutally honest about her own confusion and frustration with unknowns. So, naturally, I was over the moon when I heard she’d secured a book deal. read more

Diversity, Normalcy, and the Real World

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Back in October, “Selma” director Ava DuVernay’s spoke at Elle’s Women in Hollywood awards. She spoke about diversity, but she framed her thoughts in an unusual way: She pointed out that what the media dubs “diversity” is really just “normalization.” She said:

Last thing I’ll say is I really hate the word ‘diversity.’ Oh, I just don’t like it. It feels like medicine. Diversity is like, ‘Ugh. I have to do diversity.’ I recognize and celebrate what it is, but that word, to me, is a disconnect. There’s an emotional disconnect. Inclusion feels closer; belonging is even closer. Because we all belong to film. We all belong to television. We all belong to what this is. We look at Shondas and the Jills and the Oprahs and the Kathryns and all the women doing work behind the camera … So, I just want us to think about belonging. Think about who belongs. And welcoming people into that belonging. read more