Posts Tagged: model

This Week I Love …

eff your beauty standards

… Tess Holliday’s Instagram, Eff Your Beauty Standards.

So first, if you don’t know Tess, she’s a size 22 model with a major agency contract and a huge fanbase. As you can imagine, she is the target of a whole lotta body hate, and she does her best to take it in stride. And because Instagram is social, you’ll find some godawful comments on her Eff Your Beauty Standards feed, but the posts themselves are a marvelous mix of inspirational-but-not-sappy quotes, photos from fans of all sizes and ages, a general celebration of bodies, beauty, and humanity. read more

On Effortlessness

effortless style

A few months back, I spoke to a St. Kate’s class about style and body image. I can’t quite remember how it came up, but at some point I found myself listing off the number of products I use on my face to create what magazines deem the “no makeup look.” I’ll recap for you: Even putting aside moisturizer, sunscreen, and under-eye cream, I use BB cream, concealer, eyebrow pencil, blush, eyeliner, and mascara. So between six and nine products. If I skip the eyeliner and mascara – which I often do out of sheer laziness – it takes me about 10 minutes to do all of this. Add them back in at we’re talking at least 15, possibly more since I still kinda suck at eyeliner and frequently have to perform some sort of Q-tip triage. read more

Models as Walking Clothes Hangers

models

OK. So. I really do get that fashion shows are meant, on some level, to be viewed as pageantry, pure art, theater. High-end designer clothes get worn by very few actual people – the haute couture stuff by even fewer – because very few actual people can afford them. Many clothing designers consider themselves to be visual artists, and clothing is simply their chosen medium.

And I try really, really hard to remember this when I hear the argument for extremely tall, extremely slim models as the ONLY choice for runway shows. When I hear the argument that these women are basically just “walking clothes hangers,” that their bodies shouldn’t interfere with how the clothing appears. read more