Posts Tagged: movement

One Less Worry

Most people come here and see a fashion blog. And there’s a lot of fashion and shopping and personal style-related discussions here, so I get that. But I truly hope that a segment of you comes here and sees a women’s empowerment blog. Because – and I know I’ve said this 70 jillion times, but it bears repeating – I see style as just one of many ways to help boost your body image and self-confidence. And I want to boost your body image and self-confidence so that you can feel happier and express yourself more freely and begin to love yourself just as you are. read more

Originally posted 2013-04-04 06:43:39.

I’m Still a Feminist

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The more I read and write about feminism, the more I observe communities of feminists interacting, and the more I participate in discussions about feminism with my friends and colleagues, the more I realize that feminism is incredibly complicated. It is a movement with a long and contentious history, it has morphed and changed over the decades, and it is currently being championed by people who seldom agree on … anything. It is inextricably tied to countless other issues including racism, ableism, classism, and many other forms of discrimination. It is enmeshed in concepts of privilege. It means many different things to many different people, and most of those people are both passionate and articulate. Which can be quite intimidating. read more

Originally posted 2012-08-09 06:07:34.

What Does Body Positivity Mean to You?

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Almost every week, you can find something published in relation to the current body positive movement, i.e. ‘body positivity.’  I often share articles that I come across on the topic over on my Tumblr blog. A major goal of this movement is the long-awaited equalization between women who wear plus sizes and those who wear so-called ‘regular sizes.’ For decades women who wore larger sizes have felt like they were being treated and/or projected in an inferior way to their smaller-sized peers. Why? First, it was virtually impossible to find fashionable clothing in double digit sizes. Secondly, the lack of equal visible visual representation in mainstream media and retail advertising strategies was a source of contention. read more