Posts Tagged: red

Winter Thrifting Tips

How to thrift in winter

Winter can feel like a crummy time to thrift. We’re sluggish and uninspired, so the prospect of digging through the racks may be overwhelming. But in my opinion, thrifting is a four-season sport and there are many great bargains to be had even during the dark, cold months. Here are a few things to keep in mind if you hit the secondhand circuit this winter:

Layering items

The fine art of layering without lumps requires us to have some close-fitting underlayers. Why spend $10 a pop at Target when you can plunk down a dollar or two for tanks, tees, and long-sleeved shirts at the thrift store? Since these pieces won’t get close scrutiny and since they need to fit tightly enough that they may not be appropriate for stand-alone wear, scrimping on them just makes sense. read more

Originally posted 2012-12-13 06:43:40.

Color Blocking Shortcuts

how to color block

Oh, color blocking. You are a concept that has been floating around the fashion world for several years now, making many of us scratch our heads in confusion. You sound so simple! I mean, isn’t color blocking just wearing multiple swaths of solid color? Can’t I throw on a cobalt top and red pants and say I’ve color blocked?

Well, yes. But it helps to use a few shortcuts to make such outfits feel more finished. Sometimes a pink tank top and an orange skirt may look “mismatched” instead of “color blocked.” Here are a few shortcuts to successful color blocking: read more

Originally posted 2012-07-10 06:04:49.

Power Clothes

Fashion, clothing, and style are often portrayed as frivolous interests. Wasteful of time, energy, and money. Vain and self-absorbed. Unimportant in the grand scheme of things.

Which is downright hilarious when you consider how important clothing has been to human culture over time. Clothing has served as a medium for self-expression, a way to quietly rebel, and a means of delineating power structures. Now, I’m no historian and I’m sure some of you ARE historians, so I encourage you to peek at the contributions in the comments. But from a non-historian’s brain come the following examples: Throughout many cultures, royalty and nobility will show rank and wealth by wearing certain colors, materials, and garments. Judges and clergy wear robes to indicate authority and set the tone in courtrooms and places of worship. Athletes associate with their chosen sports through accessory, shoe, and clothing choices. read more

Originally posted 2012-09-25 06:19:21.